• The Man in the White Suit
    • Commercial pressures, both from manufacturers and workers, are applied to keep a revolutionary fabric from seeing the light of the day, and a young Alec Guinness must fight vigorously to overcome them. While the movie is dated, the subject still rings true today.

  • Arrival
    • An interesting alternative to the prevailing "aliens attack the earth" scenario, the movie focuses on how (and how not) to communicate with a species that may have very different concepts and understandings of how the universe works. No battles with aliens here, just battles of the mind, along with a narrative structure which ultimately turns out to have deceived the viewer.

  • Hitchcock
    • A look at the lives of Alfred Hitchcock and his wife Alma -who contributed quite a bit to his film-making- in the run-up and during the making of Psycho. Apart from personal struggles, encounters with studio bosses, actors and actresses, censors and just about everyone else, are on display. The creative process has rarely looked so combative.

  • The Gentlemen
    • Fast-paced mix of crime and action, a lot of it narrated by a Hugh Grant we haven't seen before like that. Rough guys from the hood, bad guys with style, bad guys without style and journalists trying to uncover it all come together to deliver a lot of dead bodies. Entertaining not so much in a comedic way, but in the way the story is told, shot and cut.

  • Men in Black 2
    • A rather weak sequel, which throws in a talking dog agent before Tommy Lee Jones can be fully reactivated in order to take charge.

  • Emma
    • A protagonist that seems more scheming than good-natured, compared to the same character played by Gwyneth Paltrow in 1996. The same goes for her father - Bill Nighy is even more detached from the various goings-on, and says much more with a wrinkle of his wrinkled face than with words. The screenplay has more small funny moments than its predecessor, making this, along with the more scheming Emma, a more enjoyable film to watch than the overly sweet 1996 version.

  • The Roads Not Taken (at the Berlinale)
    • A day in the life of a man afflicted with dementia, showing the difficulties of daily life, the unquestioning support of his daughter, and the memories that come to him triggered by the reality he lives in. This is a great movie with humanity and compassion, giving Javier Bardem and Elle Fanning much opportunity to shine. (That likely means winning the Competition is out of the question...)

  • Favolacce (at the Berlinale)
    • The lives shown during a hot summer in the suburbs of Rome are a slow-burning fuse in search of a train wreck, to mix some metaphors. There is some nasty behavior on display by the adults, with their children causally disregarded or debased. The character with the least going for him -intellectually and financially- has the most positive attitude. When the explosion of the train wreck finally arrives, it's from an unexpected direction. Did I mention that this is not exactly a comedy?

  • Knives Out
    • A great ensemble cast centered around Daniel Craig -who clearly enjoys being very different than James Bond- and a fantastic Ana de Armas as a sort of hero/villain/suspect/victim. All the dirty family secrets come out after the rich patriarch dies, whose money everyone could use, and they'll fight to keep the riches in the family when it seems to slip away from them. A great story line, compellingly told and shot, or as Craig's character puts it: A donut hole in the donut's hole. But we must look a little closer. And when we do, we see that the donut hole has a hole in its center - it is not a donut hole at all but a smaller donut with its own hole, and our donut is not whole at all! This is truly must-see cinema.


Movies I've seen in the past: MoviesIn2019 - MoviesIn2018 - MoviesIn2017 - MoviesIn2016 - MoviesIn2015 - MoviesIn2014 - MoviesIn2013 - MoviesIn2012 - MoviesIn2011 - MoviesIn2010 - MoviesIn2009 - MoviesIn2008 - MoviesIn2007 - MoviesIn2006 - MoviesIn2005 - MoviesIn2004